Category Archives: Uncategorized

Women of Appalachia Project 2018-19

It’s time again for the Women of Appalachia Project, a special show that is run by and for women in the Appalachian region.  It brings together visual artists and poets in a traveling art show and poetry readings.  Here are pictures of my entries.

Flower/Vase
slumped glass

Untitled
glass and clay

BROKEN WATER
clay,glass,stone,shell

Go to womenofappalachia.com for a full listing of events.

 

Riverside Artists Gallery “Poetry in Art 2018”

The Riverside Artists Gallery is putting on a show!  The opening is August 25 from 6-9pm.  Poets will read their poems and then a visual artist will talk about the artwork created to bring that poem alive.

The poem that inspired me is “Myself” by Debby Mullins

“I hear a noise in the distant night of a hound that seems to cry.  ‘What’s wrong ole dog?’  I asked myself, but myself didn’t say why.

Myself is far in the future and always has somewhere to go.  But as for me, I know nothing, my mind is just ‘to and fro’.

So like the ole dog I hear howling in the dark and distant night.  My mind is not at ease and myself just isn’t right.”

Here are pictures of the sculpture I made, the scary trees represent the dark and distant night or the past.  The white piece in front with tiny barefoot footprints the future and new hope/ideas. As myself and ole dog make their way down the path.

Can you find what’s just not right?

 

The River Exhibition

Here are some pictures of two sculptures that were juried into “The River” exhibition at the Parkersburg Art Center PAC. The opening will be on Sunday July 22, 2018 from 1:30-3:30pm.

BROKEN WATER view 1 note the falling water

BROKEN WATER view 2

BROKEN WATER detail

IN THE CURRENT

IN THE CURRENT

IN THE CURRENT detail

 

These are mixed media, slumped glass  and ceramic with added shells and stones.  And glue.

more Raku with a little bird watching

After a wicked hot May, we’ve had a few perfect days this June.  I took the opportunity to fire up the Raku kiln and finish off some pottery that’s been waiting far too long!

the Raku kiln is sitting on top of some soft brick to protect the grass

Assisted by my faithful puppy Kato we settled in for an afternoon in the shade.

Since it’s early June there is lots of birdie action to watch.  I got pics of a Redbelly woodpecker and a Downy Woodpecker hitting the suet cake.  Judging by the wad of suet they were carrying away I’d say they were feeding babies.

Downy Woodpecker

 

 

 

Redbelly Woodpecker

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There was a pair of Bluebirds checking out one of my ceramic houses.

Bluebirds

And this little ceramic owl seems a bit nervous about jumping into the fire!

some finished Raku ware

Raku Class

I taught a Raku class recently and as usual I learned a lot.  But first I had to refurbish my Raku kiln.  I’ve had this kiln since the mid 80’s? and the last time I used it I burned too much gas.  So I ordered a new kiln blanket, and relined the original kiln right on top of the old liner.  The blanket is made of spun kaolin fibers and create a fabulous heat barrier in a tiny space.  

 

the blanket can be cut to size with scissors

 

 

 

 

After piecing together some scraps on the bottom of the kiln and using high temperature wire to secure the seam it was time to apply heat!

 

 

 

 

It was a beautiful morning when I set up the kiln.  I used some soft brick stacked two high to hold the kiln shelf.  In Raku firing the pieces are usually fired one at a time so the shelf is pretty small.  A round shaped kiln is also a plus as it directs the flame around the piece keeping the temperature more even.  A small gas tank is attached and we are ready to fire!

 

 

 

 

As students arrive and glaze their pieces we get a rhythm going, preheating the next pot on top of the kiln helps to move things along as the piece is already hot when I restart the kiln.  Each firing takes 15- 30 min.

 

 

 

 

Some of the finished ware.

 

Some of my finished ware available in my store.

Letting Go

I recently donated a Green Man to an auction for my favorite local art center. The Dairy Barn in Athens OH.

Paw Paw Green Man Sun

I also decided that I was done doing craft fairs. Even though I enjoy meeting my customers in person and talking peoples ears off, the time to pack, haul, set up, and tear down a decent display is a youngsters game. I’ve been called many things but “spring chicken” hasn’t been heard in a month of Sundays.

Not to mention the breakage.

It feels good, almost as good as actually losing weight ;-D

NEW YEAR, NEW WORK

What to do when the snow flies?  Fire a kiln!  I’ve been playing with glass again and I found a new rabbit hole to explore.  I’ve entered a few of these pieces into juried shows.  I’ll let you know if I get in anywhere.  Some of them are so new I’m not sure if they’re done so they still reside on my work table.

CHASM view 1 note the falling water

CHASM view 2

CHASM detail

things are moving along…

Keeping warm and carrying on.

 

Christmas Craft Fairs, where to find my work.

You can find my work year round at the Dairy Barn Arts Center, Athens, Ohio and Nelsonville Emporium, Nelsonville, Ohio.  I’m always online just click on store in the upper left corner to go to my etsy shop.  There’s no need to register with etsy to shop, they have introduced guest checkout.

This year I’ll be doing two craft fairs, kicking things off on black Friday in Covington Kentucky at the Ohio Designer Craftsman Winterfair!

I’ll be doing the Dairy Barn Holiday Bazaar the following weekend. HOPE TO SEE YOU THERE!

My Muse

I am so very lucky to live in a most bountiful place, surrounded by trees, flowers, streams, and stars. All of this natural beauty impresses itself into my artwork much like I impress leaves into clay.  My husband and I have planted hundreds of trees on our farm since we moved here so many years ago.

spring

summer

fall

winter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I have collected leaves, bugs and other natural ephemera for as long as I can remember, I’m still partial to the red leaves of fall.  When I started making “leafy” pottery I tried to turn clay leaves into bowls and such but the age old question asked by many through the years is “but can you eat spaghetti out of it?”  No.

I did find ways to use leaves to print onto thrown ware and tiles, from super simple to extra detailed.

dogwood leaf bowl

leaf print on tile

 

 

 

 

 

 

My latest leaf product has come full circle, individual ceramic leaves that can hang on the wall or sit on a table, or both.  Click on store in the upper left corner to see all of my products.  I’m currently running a coupon code in my online shop for $10 off any order over $50, good until January 30,2018.  Just put HOLIDAY17 in the coupon space at checkout.

falling leaves

falling leaves